Local teachers learn about indigenous values for sustainability education

Prof. Phil Arnold, Religion, heads up curriculum development under an EPA grant.…

Read More

Biologists look at Climate Change effects on grasses

An international research team is involved in long term study in England.

Read More

Success in Spreading Sustainable Materials Management Practices

Students celebrate completion of Stewardship Program

Read More

EarthFest!

Over 1000 people attended this year's EARTHFEST.

Read More

Student Digital Sketchbooks: POWER ENERGY CLIMATE

Students contribute to crucial decisions which determine our energy future.

Read More

FLINT: Water+Pipes+Lead

Congressman Dan Kildee speaks candidly about the drinking water crisis

Read More

SoA studies sustainable transportation alternatives

SoA studies sustainable transportation alternatives

Do you drive, bike, walk, or ride the bus downtown? Would you be interested in using Uber or Lyft, or carpooling? “Feasibility Assessment of Sustainable Transportation (FAST): Syracuse” is a yearlong study of alternatives to single-occupancy automobiles for mobility within the City of Syracuse. Take the survey designed by faculty members and students from the SU School of Architecture.

Read more about the project here.

SU Receives EPA Grant for Curricular Development on Haudenosaunee Cultural Values and Ecological Knowledge

SU Receives EPA Grant for Curricular Development on Haudenosaunee Cultural Values and Ecological Knowledge

Phil Arnold, Religion, and Rachel May, Office of Vice President for Sustainability Initiatives, are co-PIs on an EPA EE project using the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address to teach traditional and scientific ecological knowledge and gratitude toward the natural world. Link to the project here. Read the SU News story about the project here.

Carbon Standards such as Clean Power Plan have Economic Benefits

Carbon Standards such as Clean Power Plan have Economic Benefits

Nearly all U.S. regions stand to gain economic benefits from power plant carbon standards that set moderately stringent emission targets and allow a high level of compliance flexibility, according to a new study co-authored by Charles Driscoll, University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering and Computer Science, as a project of the Science Policy Exchange.
The study published in PLOS ONE analyzed the anticipated health co-benefits of a power plant carbon standard that would achieve a 35 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2020 through cleaner fuels, energy efficiency, emissions trading and other measures. In a previous study, the researchers projected that approximately 3,500 premature deaths and hundreds of heart attacks and hospitalizations would be avoided in the U.S. each year as a result of this carbon standard. In this new study, the researchers calculated the economic value of those health co-benefits for the nation as a whole by county. Then they compared those benefits to costs that they projected for 14 commonly used power grid regions to estimate net benefits by region. Read more.