“Immersive Cloud” sculpture opens downtown

A new sculpture by SU Architecture Professor Daekwan Park was unveiled today along the Connective Corridor in Syracuse. The American Institute of Architects CNY Chapter brought the idea to fruition in conjunction with 40 Below and the City of Syracuse, to showcase collaborative spirit and to “reimagine place” at a gateway to the city’s downtown. A collection of 185 of stainless steel disks, perched on steel trunks, creates a small forest of reflected light to animate a formerly nondescript corner, while also providing seating and opportunities for play. The light rain that fell during the opening of the sculpture revealed, even to the designer, that the sculpture also has a musical component, as the raindrops made rhythmic sounds all around the visitors.

Science and Art: Water photography event

Earth Science professor Jeffrey Karson and Transmedia professors Susannah Sayler and Ed Morris came together in Watson Theater on Nov. 2 for a discussion of Water and Photography. The event was moderated by art history professor Romita Ray, who steered the conversation toward questions of why water is an inspiring subject for scientists and artists, how the technology influences their perspective on water, and what kinds of messages they are trying to convey with their photographs.

Dr. Karson has photographed the deep ocean floor and is the author of Discovering the Deep: A Photographic Atlas of the Seafloor and Ocean Crust (Cambridge UP, 2015). Sayler and Morris run the Canary Project and The Canary Lab at Syracuse University, which “develops research-based art and media focused on ecology.”

The event was sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, the SU Humanities Center, Renee Crown University Honors Program, Art and Music Histories, Light Work, Multimedia Photography and Design, Art Education, The Canary Lab, Communications and Rhetorical Studies, Earth Sciences, Geography, Science Communications, and Science Teaching.

FREE SCREENING OF “PLASTIC OCEAN”

SYRACUSE, NY, MARCH 8, 2017 – Sustainability Management at Syracuse University and student groups Students of Sustainability and Green Peace SU will be hosting a panel discussion on plastic pollution at 5:30pm followed by a free screening of “A Plastic Ocean” at 6:45pm on March 29 in Watson Theatre, in Watson Hall. Read more here.

First grants awarded for Campus as Lab for Sustainability

Six faculty and student projects will receive grants totaling $50,000 this spring through the new Campus as a Laboratory for Sustainability (CALS) funding program. The call for proposals sought projects that address climate disruption and offer opportunities for communication and outreach to the campus and wider community. Here are the winners:

  • Profs. Steve Chapin and Peter Wilcoxen, for an electric vehicle lab;
  • Profs. Amber Bartosh and Mark Povinelli, for a virtual reality simulation about energy awareness;
  • Prof. Jeongmin Ahn, to research membrane technology to reduce GHG emissions;
  • Grad student Kristina Gulches, to evaluate water and salt runoff on campus;
  • Profs. Jason Fridley and Doug Frank, to study carbon cycling in plants;
  • Grad students Hugh O. Burnham and Adam Fix, to develop an oral history of climate activism at SU.

Students push to eliminate plastic bags from bookstore

The Syracuse University Bookstore, in conjunction with the Student Association (SA), Students of Sustainability at Syracuse University and the Energy Systems & Sustainability Management Department, will be launching a reusable bag program starting this summer. The goal is to reduce usage of plastic bags, which can be harmful to the environment. Read the SU News story here.

Green Building grant announced

Professor Patrick Penfield of the Whitman School of Management and Prof. Rene Germain of SUNY-ESF were awarded a $19,000 Sustainable Enterprise Partnership Award. They will research the barriers to adoption of sustainable structural wood materials in construction. Read more here.

Carbon Standards have Economic Benefits

Nearly all U.S. regions stand to gain economic benefits from power plant carbon standards that set moderately stringent emission targets and allow a high level of compliance flexibility, according to a new study co-authored by Charles Driscoll, University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the College of Engineering and Computer Science, as a project of the Science Policy ExchangeRead more about carbon standards here.