National Wildlife Federation Second Annual, virtual EcoCareers Conference

Land your dream job for the planet with NWF’s EcoCareers Conference 2018 (an online, two-day event, February 21-22) for faculty, staff, pre-college and college students and young professionals! 

 

Find out more and register today: www.nwfecoleaders.org/conference

 

Entrepreneurs and professionals from leading organizations and businesses, will share insider knowledge on the latest clean economy jobs trends, employment demand, and required credentials and experience across myriad fields ranging from outdoor recreation to solar.

 

Speakers include:

 

– Philippe Cousteau, multi Emmy-nominated TV host and producer as well as an author, speaker and social entrepreneur for ocean conservation.

– Jigar Shah, president and co-founder of Generate Capital, creator of hundreds of thousands of solar jobs across the world, pioneer of “no money down solar.”

– Lisa Yee-Litzenberg, founder and president of Green Career Advisor who has spent over 22 years as a green career expert.

– Rue Mapp, founder and CEO of Outdoor Afro, the nation’s leading, cutting edge network that celebrates and inspires African-American connections and leadership in nature.

– David Mizejewski, media personality, author, blogger and a naturalist with the National Wildlife Federation.

 

Please join us for this two-day virtual event on February 21 and 22, 2018 to learn more about:

 

– Finding well-paid jobs in the green economy

– Developing effective career plans

– Identifying top degree programs and project leadership credentials

– Interacting with others across fields interested in leading for a green economy

 

Campus Partners: A benefit for NWF EcoLeader Partners is free registration for the EcoCareers conference for all faculty, staff and students on campus (and through February 2018 all new campus partners receive a 15% membership discount).

 

Students: Registration is complimentary for all members of the NWF EcoLeaders community! Joining the EcoLeaders Community is also free!

Faculty and Staff: Group discounts available for classes or groups.

 

www.nwfecoleaders.org/conference

 

 

SU Begins 2018 RecycleMania Collegiate Recycling Competition

Friday, February 2, 2018
logoBeginning on Sunday, Feb. 4, the Syracuse University community will participate in RecycleMania, the eight-week national recycling and waste reduction competition with colleges across the United States and Canada.

In the spirit of the competition and to improve the University’s overall recycling efforts, Sustainability Management will have a Spin the Wheel event, “To Recycle or Not to Recycle,” on Feb. 14 in the Schine Student Center atrium from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The first 120 participants to test their recycling knowledge will receive a cookie for playing the game. A second event called “Trash or Not” will be held on Feb. 28 in the Schine atrium.

Syracuse University has placed high against other Atlantic Coast Conference schools during the past few years. Last year just three ACC schools (Boston College, University of Louisville and the University of Pittsburgh) outperformed Syracuse in their waste reduction efforts.

“With the University community’s help, not only will we beat out our fierce competition, but we also have the opportunity to win the competition for 2018,” says Melissa Cadwell, sustainability coordinator of Sustainability Management. “Syracuse University could very easily increase in the national ranking, while continuing to improve recycling efforts on campus.”

The University community could improve its rankings or even take first place specifically for Total Recycling, Per Capita and Organics. Last year nationally only 11 colleges and universities out-recycled Syracuse University for Total Recycling.

This year the University will compete in the Classic Tournament, which involves three main categories: Stephan K Gaski Per Capita Classic, Diversion (formally Grand Champion) and Food Organics, all based on the weight of recyclables, trash and food organics. The University will submit actual weights, collected each week by the University’s Sustainability Management unit, to be ranked against the other competing schools. The competition runs through April 4, and the results will be announced April 16.

In last year’s competition, Syracuse University ranked 12th in the Bragging Rights Category for Total Recycling against 214 competing schools with 901,280 pounds of recyclables. Out of the New York State colleges and universities, Syracuse University ranked first out of 19 participating in this category. This category recognizes schools with the highest gross tonnage of combined paper, cardboard, and bottles and cans.

The Stephan K Gaski Per Capita Classic measures the weight of recyclables divided by the campus population. Last year, with 23.78 pounds recycled per person, the University ranked 31st in the country out of 245 colleges and universities. In New York State, Syracuse University ranked second out of the 19 participating schools.

In 2017 in the Diversion Category, with a recycling rate of 47.1 percent, Syracuse University ranked 52 out of 190 colleges and universities that participated nationally and third out of the 18 in New York State. This category combines trash, recyclables and food organics to determine the schools recycling rate as a percentage of overall waste.

The University also competes in the Food Organics category, last year coming in 32nd place out of 134 colleges and universities with 9.886 pounds of organics per capita sent to the Onondaga Country Resource Recovery’s Compost site.

Last year’s RecycleMania featured 320 schools participating from 46 states in the United States and Canada. More than 4.1 million students and staff recycled and composted 69.9 million pounds of recyclables and food organics.

The University complies with the Onondaga County Source Separation Law and has on-campus recycling bins for mandatory recyclables, such as paper, cardboard and cans/bottles. SU also recycles specialized items, including batteries, electronics, polystyrene cold shipping boxes, fluorescent light bulbs, scrap metal, compostable yard waste and construction debris. In addition, the University’s dining centers compost pre- and post-consumer scraps and donate leftover food to the SU/ESF Food Recovery Network, a student movement that uses donated leftovers to reduce food waste while feeding those in need.

Sustainability Management can provide further information on sustainability and recycling efforts. Visit the SU Sustainability website, follow @SustainableSU on Twitter and Instagram, and check out the Syracuse University Sustainability Facebook page.

To learn more about RecycleMania, visit http://recyclemania.org/.

About Syracuse University

Founded in 1870, Syracuse University is a private international research university dedicated to advancing knowledge and fostering student success through teaching excellence, rigorous scholarship and interdisciplinary research. Comprising 11 academic schools and colleges, the University has a long legacy of excellence in the liberal arts, sciences and professional disciplines that prepares students for the complex challenges and emerging opportunities of a rapidly changing world. Students enjoy the resources of a 270-acre main campus and extended campus venues in major national metropolitan hubs and across three continents. Syracuse’s student body is among the most diverse for an institution of its kind across multiple dimensions, and students typically represent all 50 states and more than 100 countries. Syracuse also has a long legacy of supporting veterans and is home to the nationally recognized Institute for Veterans and Military Families, the first university-based institute in the U.S. focused on addressing the unique needs of veterans and their families.

‘Climate Comments’ Website Translates Complex Climate Change Policy into Plain Language

Wednesday, January 17, 2018, By Martin Walls

Climate Comments,” a website designed to make accessible complex environmental regulations and proposals and to inspire individuals to participate in public policy decisions about climate change that affect their lives, has been published by Emily Brown, assistant teaching professor in the College of Law. Developed with a Syracuse University Campus as a Laboratory for Sustainability (CALS) grant, the site currently explores the proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan (CPP).

Emily Brown

Emily Brown

The site not only encourages individuals to learn about climate change regulations and proposals, it facilitates interacting with them via the website regulations.gov and provides examples of comments both for and against new proposals. The comment period for the CPP repeal proposal ends on Jan. 16.

The CALS grant enabled Brown to work with three law student research assistants and four undergraduates from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications to review climate change regulations and to distill proposed rules into accessible summaries on the website. These short, plain English policy analyses also are being shared via Twitter (@Climate_Comment) and Facebook (facebook.com/ClimateComments) in a social media campaign that aims to harness the potential of college student engagement in public policy debates surrounding climate change rule-making.

On the website, the law students and undergraduates have summarized pertinent information about critical climate change policies put forward by previous administrations and now under review by President Donald J. Trump. The CPP—developed by the Obama Administration—aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from electrical power generation by 32 percent by 2030, but the current administration is proposing to repeal CPP in its entirety.

Another regulation under review is the Clean Air Act (CAA), one of the most comprehensive air quality laws in the world, which was first enacted in 1963 and which has been through several amendments. The Trump Administration proposes to return to an interpretation that limits emission-reduction measures applied to individual sources rather than whole industries. Also on the website is a summary of the 2009 EPA “Endangerment Finding,” which was a result of the Massachusetts v. EPA (2007) Supreme Court decision holding that greenhouse gases (GHGs) are pollutants under the CAA and that current and projected levels of six GHGs threaten the health and human welfare of current and future generations.

Brown’s project was one of five selected by the University during the latest round of CALS funding, which called for projects that address climate disruption and that offer an opportunity for communication and outreach to the campus and wider community. Funding for CALS grants comes from the Syracuse University Climate Action Plan. As energy efficiency efforts have been implemented on the Syracuse campus in recent years, some of the savings have gone into this research fund. The selection committee was drawn from an advisory group of faculty from all University schools and colleges.

About Syracuse University

Founded in 1870, Syracuse University is a private international research university dedicated to advancing knowledge and fostering student success through teaching excellence, rigorous scholarship and interdisciplinary research. Comprising 11 academic schools and colleges, the University has a long legacy of excellence in the liberal arts, sciences and professional disciplines that prepares students for the complex challenges and emerging opportunities of a rapidly changing world. Students enjoy the resources of a 270-acre main campus and extended campus venues in major national metropolitan hubs and across three continents. Syracuse’s student body is among the most diverse for an institution of its kind across multiple dimensions, and students typically represent all 50 states and more than 100 countries. Syracuse also has a long legacy of supporting veterans and is home to the nationally recognized Institute for Veterans and Military Families, the first university-based institute in the U.S. focused on addressing the unique needs of veterans and their families.

Syracuse University Hult Prize winners announced

Student startups Farm to Flame Energy and Drop Top won first and second place respectively in the Syracuse campus qualifier for the prestigious Hult Prize, hosted by the Blackstone LaunchPad at Bird Library this week.

Farm to Flame Energy will now advance to one of 15 regional finals in March 2018, and first alternate, Drop Top, will move on to an open national competition, with another opportunity for a spot at the regionals.

A winning team from each of the 15 regional finals will be selected to participate in an eight-week summer residency at the Hult Castle accelerator in the United Kingdom, and a chance to pitch at the United Nations in September 2018, with the winning team receiving the $1,000,000 grand prize.

Farm to Flame Energy team members, William McKnight (left) and Sayje Lasenberry (right)

Farm to Flame Energy, is founded by William Lee Mendes McKnight ’18, Arts and Sciences.  The venture partners with entrepreneurially-minded community members in developing countries to collaboratively design and develop micro-grid solutions, leveraging locally grown crops, to harness the power of energy and build more sustainable rural economies.

Farm to Flame Energy’s patented, smokeless, odorless, efficient bio-mass combustion system can be used for micro-grids, and integrated with a cloud-based sensor system and data analysis for real-time monitoring.  The team proposed a franchise model to achieve scalability, empowering community entrepreneurs and farmers in developing countries to become business partners.  The model includes a strong agricultural education component, teaching local farmers how to plant high yield energy crops that are best suited for their climate and soils, which can be used as local biomass sources.

The model created by Farm to Flame Energy has the power to address Hult’s goal of impacting 10 million people by the year 2025, since it is estimated that 960 million people live in energy poverty in rural areas around the globe.  “I am thrilled that our venture is gaining recognition, so that we can start bringing electricity to those who need it,” said McKnight, who is majoring in history and minoring in chemistry.  He is the son of Lee McKnight, associate professor in the iSchool.

Farm to Flame Energy team members include Kwaku Jyamfi ’18, a chemical engineering major in Engineering and Computer Science, and Sayje Lasenberry ’19, who is majoring in sustainable energy management at SUNY ESF.

Drop Top team members (left to right), Matthew Goodman, Jason Kuperberg and Serena DeSeta

Second place winner, and alternate for the regionals, is Drop Top, with a concept to conserve water and enhance drip irrigation utilizing REVLAR, a waterproof, tear-proof, durable, and impervious paper-thin material specifically designed to withstand high/low temperature fluctuations.  Drop Top’s ingenious design, made entirely of REVLAR, increases agricultural output while conserving water.  The venture also utilizes a franchise model to create scalability and help local farmers become entrepreneurs through education and empowerment.

Drop Top team members include Jason Kuperberg ’18, a biotechnology major in Arts and Sciences,  Serena DeSeta ’18, a dual major in entrepreneurship and emerging enterprises and advertising and business communication in Whitman, and Matthew Goodman ’19, a design major in Visual and Performing Arts (VPA).

Hult Prize Syracuse campus judges included:  Alejandro S Amezcua, Assistant Professor, Whitman School of Management; Karen Livingston, energy entrepreneur and senior business advisor, New York State Small Business Development Center; Joshua Aviv, founder, SparkCharge, and entrepreneur in residence, Falcone Center for Entrepreneurship; David Eihlers, innovation consultant, and former co-founder of Blue Highway, as well as adjunct faculty, MBA@SU; and Amanda Chou ’18, founding member and chief marketing officer of Thrive Projects. Thrive Projects was last year’s Syracuse campus Hult Prize winner, and went on to the regionals in Boston.

Ten teams pitched in the campus qualifier, receiving consistently high scores from the judges in a very tight competition.  The other eight teams included:  ComEnergy, led by Tyler Vartabedian (Engineering and Computer Science); Flow, led by Michael McCormack (Whitman); Flux, led by Nate Banks (Architecture); GiraTech, led by Teodoro DeLellis (Engineering and Computer Science); Inspire, led by Kayla Simon (Engineering and Computer Science) and Kutokea, led by Aaron Mwewa (Maxwell).

The Hult Prize, known as “The Nobel Prize for student startups,” seeks out game-changing student social enterprises that compete to solve the world’s toughest challenges.  This year’s theme, “Harnessing the Power of Energy,” issued a challenge to conceive a scalable solution to transform the lives of 10 million people by 2025.  Energy-powered innovation was broadly defined to include six core areas:  connectivity; mobility; farming, food and agriculture; water collection, storage and transport; health and the human experience; and education.  Syracuse winning teams, Farm to Flame Energy and Drop Top, proposed ideas that combined energy, agriculture, education, conservation, and sustainable enterprise. Judges particularly liked their grassroots-driven franchise models that encouraged community-based entrepreneurship, as well as energy innovation.

Swedish billionaire entrepreneur and philanthropist Bertil Hult established the competition in 2009, and each year the Hult family donates $1,000,000 in seed capital to the winning social enterprise. Rutgers Business School students won last year’s grand prize for their solar-powered rickshaw, Roshni Rides, to reduce energy and encourage sustainable transportation in developing countries with large refugee populations.

Learn more at:  http://www.hultprize.org/

Invest Syracuse Progress: New Euclid Route Shuttle to Launch in the Spring Semester

Tuesday, December 12, 2017, By Shannon Andre

As part of the $100 million Invest Syracuse initiative to enhance the student experience, Syracuse University, in collaboration with Student Association (SA) and the Graduate Student Organization (GSO), announced plans for a new pilot shuttle to service Euclid Avenue. The new shuttle route will increase late night, off-campus transportation options.

Bus at the College Place bus stop

The Euclid Avenue shuttle route will operate during late-night hours on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with stops along Euclid Avenue down to Westcott Street. SA leaders James Franco ’18, president, and Angie Pati ’18, vice president, say a strong partnership with University leaders and passionate student advocates made the new shuttle route possible.

“One of Student Association’s priorities is to enable safe transportation of students around the campus and communities surrounding it. We were able to offer a successful ride-sharing partnership earlier in the semester that helped address this, and now we are excited to see one of our flagship initiatives become a reality in the spring semester,” says Franco. “We truly believe that this will improve the quality of student life for many, as students now can have access to a consistent, convenient and safe way to travel around the most heavily student-populated neighborhoods off campus. We are thankful to the many people who made this possible and appreciate the support of University leaders.”

Working with SA and GSO, the Divisions of Enrollment and the Student Experience; Business, Finance and Administrative Services; and Campus Safety and Emergency Services outlined plans to launch the shuttle. The Parking and Transit Services team assessed routes in the east neighborhood and found opportunities to expand services.

The Euclid Avenue shuttle route will operate during late-night hours on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with stops along Euclid Avenue down to Westcott Street. The new route will include stops most requested by students and run at an increased frequency. Additionally, due to student interest, beginning in the spring semester, the Price Rite, located on Erie Boulevard, will be added to the East Campus Bus route on Saturday and Sunday.

“We are pleased that one of the first Invest Syracuse initiatives to enhance the student experience comes as a result of direct partnership with student leadership,” says Dolan Evanovich, senior vice president for enrollment and the student experience. “The additions we are making will not only provide greater convenience and access to the east neighborhood, but also increase safe travel options when students live or travel off-campus. We look forward to continuing to work with Student Association and GSO to launch this program.”

Additional details, including times and route information, will be posted on the Parking and Transit Services website in the coming weeks.

Food Services Receives an A+ Score for the Second Year

Friday, December 1, 2017, By Keone Weigl

Having a vegan lifestyle doesn’t mean you have to give up eating well in the Syracuse University dining centers. In fact, there are an abundant amount of choices at every meal. SU graduate student A’keema Austin has been a vegan for the past three years. In this time, she has become more thoughtful about the food she consumes, so eating in the dining centers has been an eye-opening experience.

vegan pizza

Vegan pizza is among the options offered in the University’s dining halls.

“Every time I go into the dining center, I notice something else that I could use to make a satisfying meal,” Austin says. “I’m very impressed with the options. The staff has also been accommodating and helpful whenever I have a question. ”

PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) has also recognized Syracuse University’s dedication to serving the vegan population with its annual Vegan Report Card. For the second year in a row, SU Food Services has received an A+ grade for its vegan food selection in the dining centers. Criteria for grading included:

  • promotes vegan options
  • labels vegan entrees and desserts
  • offers nondairy milk
  • participates in Meatless Monday
  • offers an all-vegan station

Ruth Sullivan, Food Services Registered Dietitian, says that Food Services goes above these guidelines. “Each dining center has a large area dedicated to vegan foods. Besides our featured entrees, we serve a variety of grain salads, pizza, deli items and desserts.”

“Our menu committee has been working to eliminate as much processed vegan foods as possible in order to keep the selections fresh and exciting.” says Sullivan.

This year, more than 1,400 universities across the U.S. were surveyed. Seventy percent of them now offer at least one vegan option on their dining hall menu, and 19 percent have all-vegan dining stations, like SU.

PETA representative Hannah Kinder says, “Syracuse University is on the forefront of the shift toward more sustainable, healthy and vegan food options.”

If you would like to see the vegan options that are offered daily in University dining centers, visit the SU Food Services web site: foodservices.syr.edu. There is a link on the home page to “Daily Menus and Nutrition information.”

“Immersive Cloud” sculpture opens downtown

A new sculpture by SU Architecture Professor Daekwan Park was unveiled today along the Connective Corridor in Syracuse. The American Institute of Architects CNY Chapter brought the idea to fruition in conjunction with 40 Below and the City of Syracuse, to showcase collaborative spirit and to “reimagine place” at a gateway to the city’s downtown. A collection of 185 of stainless steel disks, perched on steel trunks, creates a small forest of reflected light to animate a formerly nondescript corner, while also providing seating and opportunities for play. The light rain that fell during the opening of the sculpture revealed, even to the designer, that the sculpture also has a musical component, as the raindrops made rhythmic sounds all around the visitors.

Science and Art: Water photography event

Earth Science professor Jeffrey Karson and Transmedia professors Susannah Sayler and Ed Morris came together in Watson Theater on Nov. 2 for a discussion of Water and Photography. The event was moderated by art history professor Romita Ray, who steered the conversation toward questions of why water is an inspiring subject for scientists and artists, how the technology influences their perspective on water, and what kinds of messages they are trying to convey with their photographs.

Dr. Karson has photographed the deep ocean floor and is the author of Discovering the Deep: A Photographic Atlas of the Seafloor and Ocean Crust (Cambridge UP, 2015). Sayler and Morris run the Canary Project and The Canary Lab at Syracuse University, which “develops research-based art and media focused on ecology.”

The event was sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, the SU Humanities Center, Renee Crown University Honors Program, Art and Music Histories, Light Work, Multimedia Photography and Design, Art Education, The Canary Lab, Communications and Rhetorical Studies, Earth Sciences, Geography, Science Communications, and Science Teaching.

Ten Tons of Love Donation Reaches 14 Tons

Wednesday, June 14, 2017, By Shannon Andre

From April 27 through May 11, campus community members participated in the annual Ten Tons of Love collection drive sponsored by the Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services. This year’s collection resulted in 14 tons of donated goods. The total for clothing, household items and electronics came to 12 tons, all of which benefited the Rescue Mission and its programming. The total food donations came to two tons. Due to an outpouring of food donations, Off-Campus and Commuter Services was able to stock the Hendricks Chapel Food Pantry and provide additional donations to the Food Bank of Central New York and the Interreligious Food Consortium. “This year’s Tens Ton of Love effort was remarkable,” says Elin Riggs, director of the Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services. “Through our added partnerships and the great generosity of our campus community members, we were able to contribute even more to benefit the community.” For more information, contact the Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services at 315.443.5489.